Amazon licenses Slack for all employees, while Slack adopts AWS video-calling tech

  • Slack will draw on the underlying technology for Amazon Web Services’ Chime video-calling service to deliver better video calls for millions of Slack users.

  • Employees of Amazon, one of the largest employers in the U.S., will be able to use Slack if they wish.

  • The alliance helps both companies battle Microsoft, whose Teams communications service has grown in popularity alongside Slack during the coronavirus pandemic.

Slack and Amazon are deepening their partnership. Under a new deal announced Thursday, all Amazon employees will have access to Slack’s workplace collaboration tools. In addition, Slack will deepen its reliance on AWS, revamping its video-calling feature to take advantage of an AWS service called Chime.

Read More: CNBC.com

Linus Torvalds says, “Start Small”

Kshitij Chandan has a link to a quote by Linus Torvalds:

Nobody should start to undertake a large project. You start with a small _trivial_ project, and you should never expect it to get large. If you do, you’ll just overdesign and generally think it is more important than it likely is at that stage. Or worse, you might be scared away by the sheer size of the work you envision.

So start small, and think about the details. Don’t think about some big picture and fancy design. If it doesn’t solve some fairly immediate need, it’s almost certainly over-designed. And don’t expect people to jump in and help you. That’s not how these things work. You need to get something half-way _useful_ first, and then others will say “hey, that _almost_ works for me”, and they’ll get involved in the project.

And if there is anything I’ve learnt from Linux, it’s that projects have a life of their own, and you should _not_ try to enforce your “vision” too strongly on them. Most often you’re wrong anyway, and if you’re not flexible and willing to take input from others (and willing to change direction when it turned out your vision was flawed), you’ll never get anything good done.

In other words, be willing to admit your mistakes, and don’t expect to get anywhere big in any kind of short timeframe. I’ve been doing Linux for thirteen years, and I expect to do it for quite some time still. If I had _expected_ to do something that big, I’d never have started. It started out small and insignificant, and that’s how I thought about it.

Last 20 Years of Journey

I started my first business entity in 1999 as my web designing agency. Later on in 2000 I started a 3 page eCommerce website of mine where in I used to sell Linux, BSD and Network Tools CDs. There after I have worked in all sorts of small and big companies in big and small roles respectively.

I have done HTML4.1 and CSS2. I have done Photoshop. I have done bit of Usability and UX. And I have done a lot of Ruby programming.

Its been 20 years since I bought my first computer and its now like 9 PCs, 12 Laptops and 1 iMAC and 1 MacBook Air now and I am planning to buy 1 more iMAC very soon.

Life is now gearing up for next 20 years.

Edtech startup Quizlet achieves unicorn status

Quizlet has raised $30 million in a Series C led by General Atlantic, propelling the online learning startup to a $1 billion valuation.

The San Francisco-based startup said the funds would be used to invest in its data science and machine learning capabilities. Specifically, the company is looking to grow Quizlet Learn, an AI-powered tutor that can adapt to students’ individual needs and provide feedback.

Quizlet, which is known for digital flashcards, recently added features for remote learning and made its education service free for teachers in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The company’s platform has more than 50 million active users a month.

As the pandemic has forced a shift to online learning, educational technology has gained renewed attention. The category attracted more than $2 billion in venture funding in the first quarter of 2020, the largest quarterly capital infusion in more than a year, according to PitchBook data. China’s Yuanfudao led the funding drive with a $1 billion round, followed by Indian startup Byju’s, with $400 million in financing.

More @ PitchBook.com

Apple acquires Virtual Reality startup NextVR

Apple has acquired the Virtual Reality startup, bringing more momentum to its VR technology plans.

Tech giant Apple recently confirmed that it acquired NextVR. The Virtual Reality startup provides sports and other content for VR headsets. The new Apple acquisition helps Apple’s development of VR and AR headsets along with software and content to go with it. The startup also provides the content to several existing VR headsets. These include Facebook’s Oculus and various devices from Sony, HTC and Lenovo. Also Read – Apple working on a 10.8-inch iPad and new iPad mini models, says analyst Ming-Chi Kuo

Apple has had ambitious plans for virtual reality for a while now. Hence, we heard of this deal in reports months ago. A report from 9to5mac also suggested the acquisition of NextVR was worth $100 million.

Read More: BGR.in

Increase in demand for Software Developer

If you are interested in pursuing a career in development and don’t know where to start, here’s your go-to guide for salaries, skills, and the best programming languages to learn.

Developers are among the most highly sought-after tech professionals in the workforce, with increased demand and talent shortages leading to large salaries for many of those in the field. That said, software development is a dynamic field, in which new programming languages, frameworks, and technologies may live and die within a few years, and job needs are constantly shifting.

Why is there increased demand for developers?

Every company has become a tech company to some degree, with digital transformation projects underway in most industries to stave off disruption. This means that demand for developer talent has skyrocketed in recent years, as companies seek people who can bring digital projects and applications to life.

Front-end developers, full stack developers, mobile developers, and back-end developers are among the top 10 hardest to fill tech jobs, according to data from Indeed.

Meanwhile, the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics predicts that software developer jobs will grow 24% between 2016 and 2026–much faster than the average rate of other professions, the bureau noted. Application developer jobs are projected to grow 31% in that time, and systems developers are forecast to grow 11%.

What are some developer job roles?

Developers can take a number of different career paths. Here are a few roles in the field.

  • Mobile developer: Builds apps for mobile devices, including iOS and Android. A mobile developer might use Java, Swift, and Objective-C.
  • Full stack developer: Is able to work on both the front-end and back-end portions of an application or website. A full stack developer has specialized knowledge of all stages of software development, including server, network, and hosting environment; relational and nonrelational databases; interacting with APIs; user interface and user experience; quality assurance; security; customer and business needs.
  • Front-end developer: Builds websites by converting data to a graphical interface for the user to view and interact with, using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
  • Back-end developer: Builds the functionality and interactivity of a website, including the elements that allow users to carry out actions like logging in, creating an account, and liking posts. Depending on what you want your web app to do, you might learn languages including Java, Python, Ruby, and PHP.

Read More @ TechRepublic.com

What makes developers happy? Contributing to open source

One of the best things for your business and your developers is to encourage them to write open source software.

The top two reasons are: To improve coding skills and because they believe in open source.

Though open source has been a core aspect of enterprise computing for at least two decades, the age group that seems most dialed in is the under 24 crowd, according to the SlashData survey. More than 33% of open source contributors are under the age of 24. This makes sense because for years as the developer population has swelled, it has demographically skewed younger and younger.

More @ TechRepublic.com